I was drawn to this ridiculous New York Times styles section profile by its accompanying tweet: “From finance guy to ceramicist.” It gets better when you read the first paragraph:

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When John Mosler enthuses about clay bodies, glazes and kiln design, it is easy to forget he was once a shaper of global financial markets. But after a nearly 25-year career as a pioneer in the derivatives market, he made a clean break from finance to become a ceramist.

The piece tells the story of John Mosler, a former finance guy who traded TriBeCa and finance for Gowanus and life as a professional artisté. He makes following your dreams sound easy. You could try doing as Mosler did by following this simple 11-step process:

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1) Be born rich, preferably to a father who is the CEO of some highly specialized business.

2) Attend an Ivy League school, such as Princeton.

3) Take a gap year in Cambodia, for fun.

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4) Get a job at Lehman brothers.

5) Remember that one pottery class you took one semester at Princeton, and obsess over it.

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6) Track down your old pottery teacher and study at her workshop and get really good at making sculptures.

7) Casually take some top-level finance jobs. Stop giving so much money to charity. Stop buying fine art. Save millions of dollars.

8) Leave finance forever, motherfuckers!

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9) Find a decrepit studio in a shitty but soon-to-be-hip neighborhood and convert it into your studio.

10) Host an exhibition in your studio.

11) Profit, while remembering you’re just in it for the love of pottery.

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In short, you just get super rich, throw your high-paying job in the garbage, and go off and do some art to your heart’s content. It’s foolproof. It’s good to have goals.

Image via YouTube